able to take something

idm. สามารถอดทนได้
related: ยอมรับได้

English-Thai dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take something up with somebody — ˌtake sth ˈup with sb derived to speak or write to sb about sth that they may be able to deal with or help you with • They decided to take the matter up with their MP. Main entry: ↑takederived …   Useful english dictionary

  • not (be able to) take your eyes off something — not (be able to) take your ˈeyes off sb/sth idiom to find sb/sth so interesting, attractive, etc. that you watch them all the time Main entry: ↑eyeidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • take back (something) — 1. to get control over something you controlled earlier. Democrats hope to take back the House of Representatives in the next election. Once we give them up to the government, we will never be able to take those rights back. 2. to say that… …   New idioms dictionary

  • take off — {v. phr.} 1a. To leave fast; depart suddenly; run away. * /The dog took off after a rabbit./ Compare: LIGHT OUT. 1b. {informal} To go away; leave. * /The six boys got into the car and took off for the drug store./ 2. To leave on a flight, begin… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take off — {v. phr.} 1a. To leave fast; depart suddenly; run away. * /The dog took off after a rabbit./ Compare: LIGHT OUT. 1b. {informal} To go away; leave. * /The six boys got into the car and took off for the drug store./ 2. To leave on a flight, begin… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take — take1 [ teık ] (past tense took [ tuk ] ; past participle tak|en [ teıkən ] ) verb *** ▸ 1 move something/someone ▸ 2 cause someone/something to move ▸ 3 perform action ▸ 4 need something ▸ 5 accept ▸ 6 win prize/election ▸ 7 reach out and get ▸… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • take — I UK [teɪk] / US verb Word forms take : present tense I/you/we/they take he/she/it takes present participle taking past tense took UK [tʊk] / US past participle taken UK [ˈteɪkən] / US *** 1) [transitive] to move something or someone from one… …   English dictionary

  • take*/*/*/ — [teɪk] (past tense took [tʊk] ; past participle taken [ˈteɪkən] ) verb [T] I 1) to move or carry someone or something from one place to another Remember to take a pen with you.[/ex] What time do you take Amy to school?[/ex] The cat had to be… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • take — takable, takeable, adj. taker, n. /tayk/, v., took, taken, taking, n. v.t. 1. to get into one s hold or possession by voluntary action: to take a cigarette out of a box; to take a pen and begin to write. 2. to hold, grasp, or grip: to take a book …   Universalium

  • take — I. verb (took; taken; taking) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English tacan, from Old Norse taka; akin to Middle Dutch taken to take Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to get into one s hands or into one s possession, power, or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • take on — 1) PHRASAL VERB If you take on a job or responsibility, especially a difficult one, you accept it. [V P n (not pron)] No other organisation was able or willing to take on the job... [V P n (not pron)] Don t take on more responsibilities than you… …   English dictionary

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